Can I use your recipes on my website, in my class, or in a publication?

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We love it when food-lovers talk about our books on their own websites or in classes that they teach in their communities.  We get lots of questions from them about whether they can use recipes or other material on websites or in classes.  The answer is a little complicated.  We can’t extend written permission to copy recipes or text from our books.  That would be seen as waiving our copyright, which we can’t do.  But, our recipes can be used, in modified form.  Here’s how we understand copyright law, and this is what we’d ask you to do if you want to teach your own readers how our recipes work:

1.  Copyright law prohibits you from using exact text from our books or website.  It also prohibits you from copying recipes into your website, class materials, printed books, electronic books, or elsewhere.

2.  Modified versions of recipes can be used; that doesn’t violate copyright law.  This applies to websites and to printed materials.

3.  Please mention our books and website (BreadIn5.com) as sources for the full and original versions of the recipes.

4.  Photographs from the books and on this website are copyrighted and cannot be used without expressed permission. To arrange special permission in specific circumstances, please contact us through this website.

Thanks for your enthusiasm.  We do want to encourage people to talk about our books on the web.

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If you enjoyed this post, please consider sharing it with others using one of the social sharing buttons above. Thanks, Jeff and Zoë

118 thoughts on “Can I use your recipes on my website, in my class, or in a publication?

  1. I have your book, ABin5. I would like to make sandwich buns or rolls with the ‘Light Whole Wheat’ recipe. Maybe the size of a burger bun. Do you have a suggestion for shaping and rest time.

  2. Good Morning,Have received your book as a birthday present and am mad about bread making the only thing I cannot find is clarification as to what is an American cup measure?

    King regards

    Paul (Cornwall England)

  3. May I please use your recipe with photos for gluten-free crusty boul on my website as an example of a good gluten-free loaf for Communion Bread in Church. Please see here for what I’d like to do – http://bellsofnorwich.net/2013/09/10/one-bread-one-body-2/ I will understand if you want me to delete the photos, but they help so much. Also, I’m happy to add whatever added references to your site that you would like. Many Thanks, Will.

  4. Hi Jeff and Zoe,

    I bought my copy of The New Artisan Bread in 5 this week and have been enjoying it. I made the brioche dough and baked it into a loaf; the extra dough I used for stuffed rolls. I also plan to use the brioche in bread pudding. Do you mind if I share a modified version of the recipe on my blog, with full credit to you? I will mention your book and website, of course. I have taken all of my own photos to include in the post. Thank you for your consideration!

  5. Do I leave a bit of dough in the rising bucket as a “starter”, or should I wash out the bucket before I make a new batch? Do I snap the lid shut on the rising bucket, or just rest it on top of the bucket? Can I get the same results–crispy crust, moist interior–if I forgo the pan w/water underneath and use a covered dutch oven instead?

    • 1. you can leave a little– yes, as a starter.
      2. Depends on when you mean in the rising process? Which recipe are you using (which book/page number)?
      3. Covered Dutch oven works– which book do you have, I can direct you to specific directions (not all our books have this)?

  6. Greetings! I just wanted to share with you that I’ve read your books with great enthusiasm, have tweaked the Peasant Bread recipe quite a bit and use that as the base for absolutely everything “bread” in our family (pizza crust, pita bread, chapatis, loaf of bread, sticky buns, veggies bread rolls, etc.

    I wanted the recipe to be healthier, have more protein and good fat – but still feel and taste like bread should (i.e. not “too healthy” tasting and feeling).

    Here’s what I call Amy’s Master Recipe:

    7.5 cups white flour
    2 cups almond meal
    2 cups rye
    2 cups whole wheat
    1/2 cup gluten
    2 Tbsp salt (3 is too salty for us)
    2 Tbsp of yeast (3 is too yeasty for us)
    1/4 cup chia seeds
    6 cups warm water

    Mix it all up according to your method.

    We always make it in a cast iron pot because it’s easier. But the crust really is better with the hot water in the pan and the dough on the stone.

    My kids – and all of their friends – absolutely love this bread.

    Thank you so much for coming up with your method. It’s absolutely fabulous.

    Amy

    • Hi Fred,

      It sure is. A shame she doesn’t credit the source, until the very end of the post, when someone, perhaps you, asked her if it was ours. Thank you for the heads up.

      Cheers, Zoë

  7. Just discovered your 5min bread online.
    I would like to add a sugar, can I do this and how much do you recommend?
    Thank you

    • Hi Wilhemina,

      Which recipe are you wanting to hadd sugar to? If you mean the master recipe, you can add 2 or 3 tablespoons without great changing the recipe.

      Thanks, Zoë

  8. Hi Jeff and Zoe, I would like to start making my own bread, but I gain weight when I eat wheat. I also have issues with gluten. I have other grains to put in my bread, but not sure what to do about the wheat. And is the a sudstitute that I can use in place of the gluten. I’m excited about getting started. thank u Rae from Farwell,Mi.

  9. Is it possible to bake other breads in the crock pot–say a sour dough, an herb bread or rye breads? Do you use a basic dough (except for rye) and make modifations as to flavors or herbs that you want to use?

    • Absolutely, any dough will work, and yes, our basic dough can be flavored with just about anything you want.

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