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peasant bread

How to Make a 2-pound Loaf

In Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day and Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day we suggest baking a 1-pound loaf and give detailed instructions for making this smallish bread. It seems like a nice size loaf for a family of 4 to eat in a day. On some occasions you may want to bake a larger loaf and it requires a few adjustments to our recipe. Here are step by step instructions for baking a 2-pound free form loaf.

2 pounds pre-made, refrigerated dough (the timing will be different for fresh dough that has not yet been chilled)

peasant bread

Form the dough into a ball (here is a video on how to form wet dough), then place ball of dough on piece of parchment or a cornmeal covered Pizza Peel.

loosely cover the ball with plastic wrap. For the larger loaf we have to let it rest longer, so we don’t want it to form a tight skin or it won’t rise as well. Allow to rest at room temperature 65-70°F for 90 minutes (2 hours if using doughs made mostly with whole grains).

Preheat the oven with a Baking Stone set on the middle rack, to 450°F as read on an Oven Thermometer. Have a roasting pan on the bottom rack.

The dough will have risen slightly and probably spread sideways. It should no longer feel chilled or tight and will shake like set jell-o when you shimmy the loaf on the parchment.

Slash the loaf with 1/2-inch deep cuts.

Slide the loaf onto the baking stone. Add one cup of water to the roasting pan and bake the bread for 45-50 minutes.

Remove the golden brown loaf, take off the parchment and let it rest on a cooling rack for about an hour. The loaf may still be gummy on the inside if you cut into it before the hour is up.

Cut with a very sharp Bread Knife.

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131 thoughts on “How to Make a 2-pound Loaf

  1. Hi. Love baking bread this way.
    Anyway, I have a question. You state in your post “2 pounds pre-made, refrigerated dough (the timing will be different for fresh dough that has not yet been chilled)”. What would be different about the timing for the un-chilled dough?
    Thanks

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