Corrections to first printings of The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day (2013)

These errors snuck through, for The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day:

Page 83 Crock Pot Bread, Step 1:  Add the words “Place it on a sheet of parchment paper.”

Page 224, Step 4 in Spinach and Cheese Calzone: Should call for an orange-size piece, not grapefruit-size.

Page 268, Ingredients list for Gluten-Free Master Recipe: The metric weight of brown rice flour should read 155 grams, not 160.

Pages 268 and 275, Ingredients lists for Gluten-Free Master Recipe and Gluten-Free Challah doughs: Add 1 1/4 cups (5 1/2 ounces / 155 grams) of Sorghum flour to both recipes.

Page 272 (Gluten-Free Whole-Grain Seeded Bread): The metric weight of brown rice flour should read 310 grams, not 280.

Page 286 (Gluten-Free Sweet Brioche): note new quantities for rice flour and tapioca, and the addition of cornstarch. The Ingredients list should be changed as follows:

White rice flour: 1 1/2 cups (8 1/2 ounces / 240 grams)

Tapioca flour: 1 cup (5 ounces / 140 grams)

Cornstarch (new ingredient): 4 cups (22 ounces / 625 grams); add it in Step 1, page 287

Use only melted butter in this recipe, not oil (omit oil from ingredients list)

 

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66 thoughts on “Corrections to first printings of The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day (2013)

  1. i live in arizona…our house temp is 76 and naturally it
    is quite dry. should i make any adjustments in the basic recipe and if so what are those adjustments.
    many thanks…
    ed altman

    • Hi Ed,

      If your dough seems dry compared to what you see in our videos, you can add a couple more tablespoons of water. You can also cover with plastic wrap while it rests after shaping the loaf, so it doesn’t form a skin.

      Thanks, Zoe

  2. Hi,
    On the Artisan Bread in 5 – Master recipe it says to add 1 1/2 tbsp of yeast.
    On the New Artisan Bread in 5 – it just says add 1 tbsp of yeast.
    Let me know whats the best please.
    Thank you!

      • Ditto with salt: the master recipe calls for 1 1/2 tablespoons of salt – but that makes the bread almost inedible: way too salty. It’s like eating potato chips! Plus that much salt negatively affects the rise.
        I changed that to 1 1/2 teaspoons and it works much better.
        (N.B. I also add a small amount of diastatic malt powder and gluten powder to the mix – the malt to encourage the yeast growth, and the gluten because it helps high-hydration breads keep their shape.)

      • Our household prefers the full 1 1/2 tablespoons of KOSHER salt that is called for in the recipe. Our bread loaves rise well.

  3. Hello,
    Some people add to the dough 1 tbsp sugar and a couple tbsp of olive oil. I would like to hear your opinion.
    Does it improve the dough quality or taste?
    Is the rising time the same?
    Is it better than using only the 4 main ingredients?
    Thank you!

    • It just changes it a bit. A small amt of sugar acts as a tenderizer, same for the oil. The sugar also promotes browning if you’re oven’s not doing a great job of that. Often people use this combo when using the dough for pizza.

      All that said, I hardly ever do this. My oven browns nicely, and I like a toothsome result.

  4. Hi. Just just purchased the Kindle edition of the New Edition… on Amazon. I’d like to add the correct as a note on my Kindle. The problem is, the pages are not numbered and the Kindle only shows Locations. Can you tell me which receipe or location Page 83 refers to on the Kindle edition?

    Thank you and Happy Thanksgiving!

    Bill

    • Which bread is that? Actually, the only way to do it is to go to Kindle’s “Go To” function and type in the bread recipe you’re interested in. Stuff like this– it’s one of the reasons I still prefer paper, despite the convenience of the Kindle and other eReaders.

      • Hi Jeff, Thanks for the response. Actally, I have no way of knowing which bread it is. On the Corrections area of your website, it just lists the page number. There is no reference to which bread it is. I guess you’re right – I should have bought the hard copy. Maybe I’ll do that and cancel the Kindle version. All the best, Bill

      • Hey, Jeff.. Thanks for the help and the quick responses. I love the book, as many, many others do. I think I’ll keep the Kindle versions and buy the printed copy, too. Happy Thanksgiving to you all! Bill

  5. I just purchased the Kindle version of the new Artisan book. This is the most comprehensive artisan bread book I have and I am so excited to get started!I love this book! There are a number of photos at the end of the book. I would love to see the finished loaf when I am viewing the recipe. Can you tell me how to identify which breads go to which photo?

    • Hi Julie,

      I will have to check the kindle edition and see if there is a simple way. From your comment I take it the photos have no labels at all? Give me a bit of time and I’ll try to find out for you.

      Thanks for letting us know, Zoë

      • Thanks Julie,

        I’ve contacted the publisher and will hopefully have something to tell you soon.

        Thanks again! Zoë

      • Offline comment for Zoe,
        I have another suggestion for a revision. This is my first stab at using a digital recipe book and I really want to adapt so that I can have lots of references without taking up a lot of shelf space in my kitchen. It would be great if the table of contents provided a linkable list of breads/recipes that are included in each chapter. For example in the Flatbreads and Pizzas chapter it would include recipes contained in that chapter, etc.
        Thanks, hope this helps!

  6. I love your new book! I am going to make the soft dinner rolls on page 88 for Christmas. Can I make them ahead of time, possibly freeze them and then warm them before serving? Would that affect the texture and if I can warm them, how should I do it?

    • Freezing always hurts the texture and flavor a bit, but it won’t be bad, especially if you use an enriched dough like Challah. Allow them to defrost on the counter for 4 hours or so, then cover with foil and give it 10 to 15 min at 350F.

  7. Happy New Year, Jeff and Zoë! One question: On p. 175 of the New ABin5, it says to bake the Oat Flour Bread at 400 degrees. Is that a typo? Most of your larger loaves bake at 450. We love this bread, but 400 seems like a pretty slow oven for a 2-lb loaf and it took forever to bake when I tried it at that temp. Thanks in advance for your advice!

  8. Just signing up for the thread. So many interesting comments here. If there is an easier way to sign up for the threads than to take up comment space, I’m all ears!

    It’s clear that you two want to make the bread-baking experience very rewarding for beginners and also experienced bakers, and to continue to expand the learning experience for all. For that, we are very grateful.

  9. Hello Jeff,

    I have the old Artisan Bread in 5min/day and now the new one. Wonderful!!

    I always measure by scale because it’s much more precise so my question: Is there a new Healthy Bread in 5min/day as well?

    Best wishes,
    Susi

  10. Ruth Hoffman on December 31, 2013 at 5:47 pm said:
    Reposting this comment which appears not to have been seen. Can you tell me if 400 degrees is the correct temp for the Oat Flour Bread? Thank you!

    Happy New Year, Jeff and Zoë! One question: On p. 175 of the New ABin5, it says to bake the Oat Flour Bread at 400 degrees. Is that a typo? Most of your larger loaves bake at 450. We love this bread, but 400 seems like a pretty slow oven for a 2-lb loaf and it took forever to bake when I tried it at that temp. Thanks in advance for your advice!

    • Yep, that’s the temp, 400F, and it was listed that way in both the 2007 and 2013 editions– and it didn’t generate any problems reported here on the site. Is your oven temp accurate (check with something like…

      http://www.amazon.com/POT750X-High-Heat-Oven-Thermometer/dp/B0021AEAIK/ref=as_li_wdgt_ex?&linkCode=wey&tag=arbrinfimiada-20

      … but I have a feeling it’ll work just fine at 450F– so give it a try. Maybe the oat flour had a low burning threshold, but it’s been a long time since I tested this one, just can’t remember.

      • Thank you, Jeff! I’ll try it again at that temp. Last night I baked it at 425, checked it after 35 minutes, took it out of its pan and finished it on the oven rack for 5 more minutes or so. It was perfect!

        I do have an oven thermometer, and the temp does appear to be accurate. Maybe it’s just that my oven is new, so I am still getting used to it.

  11. Love your new book and the results. Baking bread now for the first time with great results.

    But your publisher left page numbers off the index in the kindle version. And the search in the kindle ipad app just does not work for your book. Makes it frustrating to try to find something.

    • Hi Conn,

      So glad you are enjoying the bread. Sorry the kindle experience has been frustrating. I will pass your note on to our publisher.

      Thanks, Zoë

  12. My husband and I have loved making this bread, thank you. One question though, if we wanted to switch to using baking powder, instead of yeast, would you know how much baking powder should be used?
    Thank you for your time.

    • Hi Nicole,

      You really can’t substitute baking powder for this kind of bread, and especially not a dough that is stored. Baking powder is meant to be added and then used right away or it loses its rising power. You want to look for “quick bread” recipes, which use baking powder.

      Thanks, Zoë

  13. Hi, In both the BI5 and the New Bi5 the Judy’s Board of Directors’ Cinnamon-Raisin Bread say that the recipe makes one-2 pound loaf but you only but off 1 1/2 pounds of dough. Should I be cutting of 2 pounds of dough or is the weight of the filling included in the final weight of the bread?
    Thank You!

    • Hi Sherry,

      Sure give it a try, but just don’t add too much. I’ve never added it to our dough, except in the form of a dough enhancer, so let me know what you think.

      Cheers, Zoë

  14. I love your book. Question though……. On page 88 of the New book 2013, soft dinner rolls, you say to preheat the baking stone, but then say to rest the rolls on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, then on page 89 you say to place the baking sheet in the oven and bake. Does the baking sheet need to be placed on top of the baking stone, or what? Why preheat the baking stone if you’re going to be baking on the baking sheet? I ended up baking the rolls directly on the baking stone since it was preheated, but why the baking sheet? Thank you! All the bread I’ve made has been wonderful and guests rave about it. Fun!

    • Hi Marjorie,

      I leave my baking stone in the oven for just about everything, since it helps to conduct heat and it also maintains a very consistent temperature in the oven. But, you certainly don’t have to use the stone if you are baking on a sheet. It will preheat much faster without it. Either way works well.

      Thanks, Zoë

  15. I am going to try the recipe for Brotchen. It has eggs in it; you say that dough with eggs need to be baked at 350 degrees. Your web article and your new book says preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Do you bake at 450 or set it back to 350 degrees?

    • Hi Anne,

      You can bake these at 450°F. The egg breads tend to have lots of sugar, which will burn at high temperatures, but we’ve discovered that egg breads without sugar can still be baked at a high temperature. Egg whites can go even higher.

      Thanks, Zoë

  16. I just baked the Deli Rye from the new book and it was delicious. Wondering about using dried dill in the next batch. How much dill should I use and will it be OK after several days.

    • Haven’t tried it. You can use the Herb variation in the Master recipe as a starting point, though dill may be stronger and you may want to start lower. I’d think that a dill dough would store fine in the refrigerator.

      • Dill dough?

        At 50 years of age, I laughed out loud like a 13 year old school girl when I read this!

        Thanks for the chuckle!

        Love your book and love the recipes. This is the best culinary purchase I have made in 2014.

  17. Hi
    I made the naan recipe in your new BI5 book and my husband and I love it! I only made one for our dinner. If I was to make four for a dinner since I can only make one at a time how would it be best to keep them warm and would they stay soft?
    Thanks!

  18. Hi! I’m following the master recipe, using the mass figures for my flour and water. Because I’m using KA flour, I saw I needed to add 1/4 cup additional water, and when I converted that over to grams, things stopped adding up. The most common conversion I’ve found says that 1Cup water = 236.59 grams. When I measured it out with my own cup, I got 235, which seemed really close. However, your conversions of 3 cups = 680 grams are off by about 30 grams, which becomes even worse when doubling the recipe. Which measurement is more ideal, the cups, or the grams?

    • My math says 235 gms x 3.25 cup = 763.75

      Moreover, 3 cups x 235 gms = 705 not 680 gms as stated in the master recipe

      Is this the weight of 100 degree water vs room temp.
      I’m still confused.

      • It is confusing, I’d have to agree, for a couple of reasons. Let me answer the temperature question first. Basically, the difference in volume between 68-degree water and 100-degree water is negligible. And of course the weight is the same.

        Second, we made the assumption that a U.S., 8-ounce fluid measuring cup, when filled with water, will weigh 8 U.S. ounces (excluding cup-weight). Some authorities say it’s 8.2 ounces, but we didn’t find that to be the case with any of the commercially-available measuring cups bought in our area. We want to stick with what is likely to agree with our reader’s equipment, even if that doesn’t measure up to laboratory standards (it doesn’t, typically). One of the confusing areas is that U.S. liquid measure and U.S. weight use the same word for the unit: the “ounce.” It’s terrible and I wish we could stick with metric (but we can’t, if we want U.S. readers to use the book). If you go along with that, next step:

        1 ounce (U.S. weight) = 28.35 grams. That’s pretty clear if you check references.

        So, 8 U.S. fluid ounces of water weighs 28.35 x 8 = 226.8 grams. Three cups, therefore, weighs 680.4 grams, which we round to the nearest gram in our recipes. So 3.25 cups weighs 737.1 grams, which will round to 740 in most home scales (which round to the nearest 5 grams). I think Zoe actually measured that for Travis with a scale rather than running through this rigmarole. I’m glad Zoe and I agreed using two different methods.

        You and Travis would be exactly right– if we assumed that a cup of water weighed 8.2 U.S. ounces, but as I said, that’s not what we got when we actually used the equipment available to home bakers. Hope this helps.

  19. Correction? 2013 edition. p.224. Receipe for Spinace and cheese calzone, Section 4, says 1/2 pound (grapefruit-size) piece. On p. 223, as the first of the list of ingredients, it says 1/2 pound (orange-size portion). I believe on p. 224, it should say orange-size rather than grapefruit-size.

  20. I was going to make hamburger buns with the buttermilk dough from the New ABin5. On p. 327 it says you can use the dough in any recipe and lower the baking temperature to 375. But on p. 328 it says to preheat the oven to 350. Can you bake this dough at 375, or is it better to go at 350? Thanks!

    • Especially for small “loaves” like hamburger buns, it won’t over-brown at 375– the baking time’ll be relatively short.

  21. With the correction to the master GF loaves…is the sorghum flour a new ingredient in addition to the other flours, or does it replace an ingredient?

  22. I just made the the crispy cheesy bread sticks from the New ABin5. It says to roll the dough out to 1/8 inch thick, and then cut it into strips 1/8 inch wide. Can 1/8 wide strips be right? I cut mine into about 1/2 inch strips, and they turned out great. Just wondered when I read that if there was a mistake!

  23. This question may have occurred before but am new to your book and your bread baking process. I have always used dough enhancer and extra gluten when making bread even when using all-purpose flour. What is your suggestion for the Master recipe regarding the use of these two additional ingredients?

    • We don’t use them with the Master recipe– if you use VWG you’ll have an effect more like bread flour, but you need to use extra water, not sure how much.

  24. I am totally torn. My previous books are digital, i.e. Kindle or Nook. Since I want to buy the latest book, I’d love to have a hard copy and digital copy. Both have their own advantages. Not sure which I will decide on. Have you ever thought of a discount when buying both or ebook add-on option? Thanks for all of the delicious recipes. They are absolutely the best!

    • Hi Sandy,

      I wish I had something to do with the pricing, but that is completely in the hands of the publisher and the powers at Amazon. It is always a mystery how they decide how much to charge?

      Thanks! Zoë

      • Thanks for your reply Zoë. I’ll make the suggestion to Amazon too. Now to decide which to get. You guys make me look like such a fantastic baker!

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