Truck Stop Cinnamon Rolls!

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Making cinnamon rolls is hands down one of the most popular ways that folks use our brioche dough. Not only is this an easy dough to prepare, but since it can be used for up to five days after being made, there is the potential to eat cinnamon rolls every day of the week. Of course, we stand by the phrase “all things in moderation,” but it’s still nice to know that there’s a way to make every Monday morning more enjoyable.

Truck stop cinnamon rolls are not much different than our regular buns, they are just significantly bigger (each one can serve two. Or more?). They are perfect for brunch or company; a special indulgence. We have two ways to make them: large and extra large. Our video for Gold Medal Flour shows how to make them plus-sized for just a few, and our post below shows them just a bit smaller, to feed more. Either way, they’re a great choice.

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Truck Stop Cinnamon Rolls (For A Crowd)

2 1/2 pounds Brioche dough (page 300 of The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, or the recipe here on the website)
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon orange zest
6 tablespoons butter, melted

Cream Cheese Icing:

8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
6 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
4 tablespoons heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon orange zest

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Here is the secret to getting the right texture for the buns. You need to fold the dough over a few times and get that gluten all linked up and excited. This happens naturally with the master recipe, but all the butter in the brioche can stand in the way, so we need to give it a little help. Just 3 or 4 turns will do the trick, an extra 30 seconds of work will make all the difference. Now that we have the gluten all excited and bunched up we need to give it a rest or it will be impossible to roll out. This may take 15-20 minutes. If your kitchen is warmer, it may go faster.

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Once the dough is ready, roll it to 1/4-inch thick rectangle. Brush the entire surface with the melted butter. In a small bowl mix together the sugars, cinnamon and zest. Spread the mixture over the butter topped dough. Use your hands to make sure you have an even coat of the sugar.

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Roll the dough up, starting at the short end.

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Use a Bread Knife, Kitchen Scissors or floss to cut the log into 8,10, or 12 equal pieces. (The 12 pieces here made medium-large buns, cutting less pieces will make larger buns.)

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Set the buns on a parchment lined Sheet Pan or in a buttered baking dish. Give them about 1 1/2 to 2-inches between them. It is okay if they rise together in the oven.

Loosely cover the buns and let them rest between 1 1/2 to 2 hours. The long rest will insure that you have a fluffy bun. (You can set these up the night before and let them rest overnight in the refrigerator. In the morning take them out and let them sit on the counter for about 45 minutes to an hour.) You may get away with slightly shorter rise, but the buns will not be quite as soft.

Preheat the oven to 350°F and place the rack in the middle of the oven.

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Bake for about 25 to 30 minutes, just until the centers are set when poked with your finger (they should be caramel colored). Let them cool for about 10 minutes.

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Mix together the ingredients for the icing and spread over the warm buns. Enjoy!

truck stop cinnamon rolls | bread in 5

Red Star Yeast (Lesaffre Yeast Corp.) provided samples of Red Star PLATINUM Yeast for recipe testing, and sponsors BreadIn5’s website and other promotional activities. 

 

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If you enjoyed this post, please consider sharing it with others using one of the social sharing buttons above. Thanks, Jeff and Zoë

18 thoughts on “Truck Stop Cinnamon Rolls!

    • Hi Colleen,

      When you take a piece of dough out of the bucket place it on a floured surface, pat it into a disk and then fold the dough over itself a few times. Does that make more sense?

      Thanks, Zoë

      • Am I unfolding the dough and folding it a few times or am I folding the disk in half, than quarters? I am confused….

  1. I make cinnamon rolls by spreading softened, but not melted butter over the rolled-out dough. I find it is neater and simplifies the process. And one less pot to clean!

  2. For what it’s worth, I’ve been really happy making cinnamon rolls with the buttermilk bread dough in the book. There’s a recipe after it for raisin/cinnamon bread. I roll the buttermilk dough out into a rectangle, sprinkle on the filling for the bread, roll it up, and then cut it into “buns.” I love them plain, or I add a simple frosting of confectioners sugar and milk. Love these!

    • Sounds great Penny,

      I like the idea of keeping the raisins, but adding all the butter and icing! I’ll have to give that a try.

      Cheers, Zoë

  3. Hi, I got 2 of your books and have just started baking bread your way, I wonder if with the super moist nature of the dough I could use a proving basket?

  4. Hi- Just wantd to say I made these with the olive oil dough from NABin5- added 1/2 C sugar (thank you Jeff for the suggestion- for a “vegan brioche adaptation” )
    and they were fantastic.
    I have been making cinamon rolls in the pans for a long time with great success but my family went wild for the truck stop style rolls- a new favorite!
    I use a simple glaze of 10x sugar, water and vanilla or almond flavoring.
    Yum.

  5. I regret that I cannot find the post that I used to post my own question about incorporating almond meal into the artisan bread. I will check here again tomorrow. Thank you.

    • Hi Nina, here is the response the question you left on FAQs:

      You can add up to a 1/2 cup with very little change to the batch of bread. Any more than that and you will need to add more vital wheat gluten and perhaps more water. It will take some experimenting, so start with a small batch.

      Thanks, Zoë

  6. Hi! I always make caramel rolls with the brioche but a friend , whose husband can only eat margarine, wants to learn how. So I’m going to use the master recipe but can I use margarine for the topping and filling?

    • Hi Claudia,

      I’ve never tried it with margarine, but I have used other butter substitutes for making the brioche dough and the caramel rolls, so I am sure it will work.

      Enjoy! Zoë

  7. Hi! I am so interested in your books but am vegan with a wheat allergy. I can eat spelt with no digestive upsets. I was wondering if I can substitute spelt for the wheat in your formulas? THANKYOU so much for your input.

    • It all depends on the particular spelt you use. The one I get at my coop is whole-grain, but believe it or not, it measures into the recipes in place of white all-purpose. It doesn’t need extra water, even though it’s whole grain (usually whole grain means more water or other liquid needed). Depending on your particular grind and moisture content, you may need more.

      It’s not going to hold a shape as nicely as white flour of course, and the flavor will be different. But still great.

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