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Apple Cider Gluten-Free Brioche and Doughnuts

Gluten-Free Apple Cider Doughnuts | Breadin5

(photo by Stephen Scott Gross and styled by Sarah Kieffer)

“…Of apple-picking: I am overtired
Of the great harvest I myself desired.
There were ten thousand thousand fruit to touch,
Cherish in hand, lift down, and not let fall.
For all
That struck the earth,
No matter if not bruised or spiked with stubble,
Went surely to the cider-apple heap
As of no worth…”
Robert Frost After Apple-Picking
This time of year nearly everything worth eating has apples in it. This gluten-free brioche from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day is made with the rich, slightly cloudy apple cider, which has a wonderful tang to it and isn’t overly sweet. You can use the clear apple juice, but it doesn’t have the same depth of flavor. This dough is wonderful baked in a loaf pan, made into a coffee cake or fried and dusted with cinnamon sugar like these doughnuts.

Apple Cider Gluten-Free Brioche

For the Apple Cider Brioche:

2 cups (11 ounces / 300 grams) Gluten-Free AP Flour Mix #1

4 1/2 cups (1 pound, 6 1/2 ounces / 640 grams) Cornstarch (we’ve found the recipe doesn’t come out as well when other starches are substituted)

2 teaspoons xanthan (or ground psyllium husk)

1 tablespoons yeast (we use Active Dry or Quick Rise from Red Star, both are gluten-free)

1 tablespoons Kosher salt

2 1/4 cups Apple cider, warmed slightly

3 large eggs

1 cup honey

1 cup unsalted butter, melted

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

  1. Mixing and storing the dough: Whisk together the flour, cornstarch, xanthan gum, yeast, and salt in the bowl of a Stand Mixer. You can also do this in any 5-quart bowl, or a lidded (not airtight) food container, but we find we got the best results in a stand mixer.
  2. Combine the apple cider, eggs, honey, butter, and vanilla, and gradually mix them into the dry ingredients, preferably using a heavy-duty stand mixer with paddle. Cover (not airtight), and allow it to rest at room temperature until the dough rises, approximately 2 hours.
  3. The dough can be used as soon as it’s thoroughly chilled. Refrigerate it in a lidded (not airtight) container and use over the next 5 days.

Use the brioche to make any of our sweets, including these doughnuts:

Makes 1/2 dozen doughnuts

You can find photos of the process of making the doughnuts here.

1 pound (grapefruit-size portion) Apple Cider Dough (above) or Challah or Brioche dough

Vegetable oil, for deep-frying

Cinnamon sugar, for dusting

Equipment

Deep saucepan for deep-frying, or an electric deep-fryer

Slotted spoon

Paper towels

Deep Fry Thermometer

  1. Fill the saucepan (or electric deep-fryer) with at least 3 inches of oil. Bring the oil to 360° to 370°F as determined by a candy thermometer.
  2. As the oil is heating, dust the surface of the refrigerated dough with rice flour and pull out a 1-pound (grapefruit-size) piece. Dust the piece with more flour and roll the dough into a ½ -inch-thick rectangle on a floured surface. Using a doughnut cutter, cut the dough into 3-inch rounds.
  3. Carefully drop the doughnuts in the hot oil, two or three at a time, so they have plenty of room to float to the surface. Do not overcrowd, or they will not rise nicely.
  4. After 2 minutes, gently flip them over with a slotted spoon and deep-fry for another minute or until golden brown on both sides.
  5. Using the slotted spoon, remove them from the oil and transfer to paper towels to drain.
  6. Repeat with the remaining dough until all the doughnuts are fried.
  7.  Dust generously with cinnamon sugar.

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26 thoughts on “Apple Cider Gluten-Free Brioche and Doughnuts

    • So sorry– there’s no water in that recipe, the only liquid is the cider. I’ve fixed the instructions now, thanks for catching that and letting us know (it’s correct in the book–http://amzn.to/1msOBmY ).

      • Thanks for the reply Jeff. At the time I sent that question I didn’t have a copy of the book; now I do as of today.

        Which brings another find – well sort of anyway. In the opening paragraph to chapter three, you use the word ‘spare.’ While technically that word does convey what you want, the sought for action would be probably be better conveyed if the word ‘sparse’ were used. Perhaps that is the word you intended to use, but a typo occurred during print set-up.

    • Sure. You can probably swap apple cider for water in the regular brioche recipe. Haven’t tried it but should work– might want to decrease the other sweetener slightly.

  1. Hello from the UK!
    Pls could you describe what consistency the mixture should be once all the ingredients are combined but not rested yet? Thank you

    • See our videos on GF by clicking on the Gluten-Free FAQs tab above, and choose “Videos: Where can I view videos so I can see what your gluten-free dough’s supposed to look like?” Any of those will show you the consistency. Soft biscuit dough (US biscuits, I’m afraid, which may not help you much!).

  2. I used the Apple Cider Gluten-Free Brioche dough to make bomboloni for my daughter who has celiac disease. They were phenomenal. No one would ever guess they were gluten free. Thank you!

  3. Are you sure the online recipe is correct? I tried it and it came out the consistency of pancake batter. Had to add double the AP flour mix #1. Also, what temperature should the liquids be? The dough didn’t really rise at all and the doughnuts tasted like yeast.

    • Hi Mary,

      Did you use xanthan or psyllium in your recipe? Did you substitute any ingredients in the recipe? Did you mix in a stand mixer or by hand?

      Thanks, Zoë

      • Zoe,

        I used psyllium husk powder but put in 2X the amount. That’s what usually works when I make bread doughs. Didn’t substitute any other ingredients. Used my Kitchen Aid stand mixer.

      • Hi Mary,

        When you mix the dough with psyllium it will seem very wet, almost liquid, but as it sits, it will firm up considerably. Did this ever happen with your dough?

        Thanks, Zoë

      • Zoe,
        Yes this happens when I make your crusty boule recipe but it takes maybe a minute. The doughnut dough didn’t firm up even after 10 minutes. I mixed and mixed and mixed and finally added more flour mixture. I don’t think the doughnuts would have been too bad if the dough had risen. Seems like the cider was too cool. The recipe says slightly warm, but what temp is that?

      • Well, I will try again in a week or so. Will check temp of cider more closely. The doughnuts aren’t that bad. My husband is eating them even though he can eat gluten. I don’t really like them but I’m a more picky eater.

  4. My daughter has an egg allergy. Do you think that flax and water would work as a substitute for the eggs in this dough? Or do you recommend any substitution for eggs?

    • Hi Heidi,

      I have had good success making the breads with the flax mixture, but I’m not tried it in the brioche. If you give it a try I’d suggest you make a small batch to make sure you like the results. Some readers have reported having good results with EnerG egg substitute as well.

      Thanks, Zoë

  5. Hi, what would you recommend in place of the cornstarch. I know you said other starches don’t work well but I and my daughter are allergic to corn. Your input would be very much appreciated. Thanks.

  6. Thanks Jeff. I can’t help the substitution in this case. A corn allergy is such a pain in so many ways. I even make my own baking powder and powdered sugar because of it. We do love the 5 min bread although it only makes 3 loaves since I have 3 people eating it. 🙂

  7. Hello,

    Have really been enjoying your gluten free recipe book. I just made this recipe for apple cider brioche. Mine turned out almost cake-like — is that they way yours turns out? Also, I would love suggestions for what to serve with this.

  8. Out of curiosity – when you say there is no substitute for the cornstarch, what other starches have you tried so far? Any besides tapioca/arrowroot/potato? I am interested in trying it with some other more unusual/obscure starches for the sake of science, but I want to avoid doing things you’ve already determined didn’t work! Thanks.

    • Hi Meg,

      I have tried all of those starches. Please let me know if you find one you like better. Which do you have in mind?

      Cheers, Zoë

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