Craftsy

Podcast with Steve Dolinsky of WABC-7 Chicago!

With Steve Dolinsky at Studio 2 Devjam

We’ve been on with Steve in Chicago before, but this time Steve was in Minneapolis and we met for a podcast about Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day at Studio2, which is a great place for coffee and breakfast but turns into a stellar wine bar with snacks later in the day. Listen to the podcast by clicking here…

Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Cornbread–great review of Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes/Day in Columbus Dispatch

Columbus Dispatch Review of GFin5

“Hertzberg and Francois offer foolproof recipes for (gluten-free) bread…”

I was in Columbus recently, and had the distinct pleasure of driving around town at dusk, looking for a hotel (I’d made my reservation for the wrong month). Great town, dumb business traveler!

Lisa Abraham (@DispatchKitchen), the Food Editor at the Columbus Dispatch, has covered all of our books–and she’s just reviewed Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Dayclick here to read the whole article, which includes our Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Cornbread. Thanks Lisa!

And click here to buy the book. 

Apple Cider Gluten-Free Brioche and Doughnuts

Gluten-Free Apple Cider Doughnuts | Breadin5

(photo by Stephen Scott Gross and styled by Sarah Kieffer)

“…Of apple-picking: I am overtired
Of the great harvest I myself desired.
There were ten thousand thousand fruit to touch,
Cherish in hand, lift down, and not let fall.
For all
That struck the earth,
No matter if not bruised or spiked with stubble,
Went surely to the cider-apple heap
As of no worth…”
Robert Frost After Apple-Picking
This time of year nearly everything worth eating has apples in it. This gluten-free brioche from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day is made with the rich, slightly cloudy apple cider, which has a wonderful tang to it and isn’t overly sweet. You can use the clear apple juice, but it doesn’t have the same depth of flavor. This dough is wonderful baked in a loaf pan, made into a coffee cake or fried and dusted with cinnamon sugar like these doughnuts.

Continue reading

Master Recipe from Gluten-Free ABin5

GF Master Recipe | Breadin5 19

In 2007, when our first book hit the stores, I had never heard of celiac disease or gluten intolerance. In the past 7 years I’ve had quite an education on the subject. It all started here on the website. People were writing in to say they loved our method, but couldn’t eat wheat. There were many, many requests, so Jeff and I set off to develop recipes that fit our fast and easy method but used flours that were gluten-free. We’ve put gluten-free breads in all of our books since then, but they were just small chapters among a bunch of wheat filled recipes. It seemed unfair to the folks who couldn’t eat wheat to buy a book filled with recipes that didn’t suit their needs, so we decided to write a book for them. Last week Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day came out and we are thrilled to share the Master Recipe with you here.

We’ve had great feedback from our original gluten-free recipes, but we wanted to simplify the method even more. That meant developing two flour mixes that all our recipes are based on, so you just have to mix the flour once for many loaves. You just mix up a big batch of our Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour Mix and/or our Whole-Grain Gluten-Free Flour mix and you’ll be able to quickly mix and bake all 90 recipes in our book. (We’ve tried commercial flour mixes, but haven’t found one that is as tasty, nor do they produce as nice a texture. If you have a brand of GF flour that you like to use, give it a try, but you may need to make some adjustments, so we recommend making a small batch to make sure you like the results.)

We also wanted to provide recipes that are mostly vegan (no eggs) and dairy free. Because eggs are a leavening ingredient, we do like the Master Recipe made with eggs for a lighter loaf. In fact, we find that the dough made with egg whites is the lightest of all the options. You can also use an egg substitute if you choose not to use eggs. And as always with our method, you save time by mixing a large batch and storing it in the refrigerator, pulling off dough to use as you need it.

GF Master Recipe | Breadin5 21

The following recipe is our Master Recipe from GFABin5 made with egg whites, but you can make the same recipe with whole eggs, egg substitutes or without any eggs at all. Continue reading

Tips on great results with gluten-free dough: We’re on KTSP-TV Minneapolis (ABC)

Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day was released today, and we went on Twin Cities Live with Elizabeth Ries and Joe Schmit to spread the news. One of the things I liked about this TV segment was that you get to see what gluten-free dough looks like when it’s nicely emulsified in the stand mixer (you can use a spoon or dough whisk, but you have to keep going to get it really smooth). One other thing to clarify from the TV segment: This book was tested with Red Star Active Dry Yeast and Red Star Instant Yeast, both of which are completely gluten-free. Gluten-free folks shouldn’t use the Red Star Platinum product because it has some dough conditioners derived from wheat.

Lesaffre Yeast Corp. provided samples of yeast for recipe testing, and sponsors BreadIn5’s website and other promotional activities.

Videos from TV segments on Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

KSTP on the air

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The most useful video is probably the one that was shot in Zoe’s kitchen. Check it out; it shows exactly what the dough should look like as it’s mixing and once you shape it.. This is the basic recipe from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day (the version with egg whites).

… but the TV spots are also fun to see Click on on any of the TV links to see us mix up and shape a loaf:

WGN-TV Chicago, October 28, 2014

KARE-11 Minneapolis (NBC) daytime show, October 22, 2014 

KTSP-5 Minneapolis (ABC), October 21, 2014

KARE-11 Saturday (NBC Minneapolis), November 1, 2014

Fox-9 News, Minneapolis, November 3, 2014

KATU-2 Portland OR (ABC), October 27, 2014

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How do I get more whole grains into my gluten-free breads?

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A reader asks: Are there any substitutions for the rice flour or the potato starch? I’m trying to boost the nutrition.

One easy thing to do is to swap brown rice flour for all the rice flour that we call for in Mixture #1 from our 2014 book, Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a DayIf you do that, you need a slight increase in water because whole grains always take a little more (see page 61 of the book). With the swap, Mixture #1 will be 75% whole grain by weight, since U.S. sorghum products are whole grain (at least, any that we’ve seen). People have asked about basing breads on almond, millet, or quinoa, but we found that if you try to base a yeasted bread on any of those, it just doesn’t work–the texture and flavor weren’t close enough to traditional bread for most of our tasters and readers.

The other thing is to focus on the recipes that use Mixture #2, which appears in Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day on page 62 (and use it in the recipes on pages 96-108). Mixture #2 is 100% whole grain in the first place.

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Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day is released

GF Book and Cloche 01

After a long year of testing, writing, and thinking about gluten-free bread, Zoe and I are proud to announce that our new book, Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day is going to be released for sale tomorrow, October 21, 2014. It’ll be available in independent bookstores, Barnes and Noble, Amazon, and all the online sellers, all over the U.S. (and actually, the world). Continue reading

Substitutions for ingredients in our gluten-free recipes

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We tried to accommodate a wide variety of food sensitivities in our gluten-free book, but some people have asked about substitutions for what we call for in the book’s flour mixtures, and on this page, we’ll summarize swaps for flours that some of our readers don’t eat. Others may be possible, but these are the ones we’ve tested and liked.

Our Flour Mixture #1 is based on rice, sorghum, tapioca, and potato, with xanthan gum or psyllium providing structure. If you’re sensitive to the bold-faced ingredient in the list below, you can try swapping in one of the suggested alternatives. But keep in mind that if the recipe already has some of that ingredient, you may throw off the flavor or consistency. Are other substitutions possible? All we can say is that they might work, but we just haven’t tested them yet. Experiment, and adjust the liquids as needed:

White rice flour: can be replaced by brown rice flour, but you need to increase the water by 2 tablespoons per full batch of our dough recipes. We have not been able to get good results without some rice flour in the recipes.

Sorghum flour: can be replaced with oat or amaranth flour

Tapioca starch/flour: can be replaced with arrowroot starch/flour or cornstarch. However, cornstarch cannot be omitted from our brioche recipe.

Potato starch: You can try proportionally increasing the other starches/flours in the flour mixture, but you may have to adjust the water to keep the consistency at about the level that you see in our TV segments.

Finally, some readers have asked why we didn’t base our gluten-free flour mixtures on ingredients like almond, millet, or quinoa. Though we use those in some of our recipes in the book, we’ve found that they don’t make a good yeasted bread unless they are used in relatively small amounts.

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Dense or gummy interior, or inadequate rising in my gluten-free breads. What am I doing wrong?

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If the breads in Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day are coming out dense or gummy, or don’t seem to rise as much as you expect, here are the things to check:

Expectations: No question about it, gluten-free breads are denser than wheat breads, and they don’t rise as high. Plus, they get most of their loft in the hot oven (that’s called oven spring). Don’t expect to see a lot of visible change while the loaf is resting (after its shaped).

If you’re not loving the no-egg version: Since 2009, our wheat books have included one chapter with gluten-free recipes, always with eggs. Many of our gluten-free readers asked for gluten-free recipes that were also egg-free, so when we wrote Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day in 2014, we made our default Master Recipe egg-free, with a variation that includes whole eggs or egg whites (on page 73). But–there’s no question that the egg versions have better rise and are less dense and gummy. If you can eat eggs, our favorite is the egg white version; there’s more on this at a post describing the version with egg. If you cannot eat eggs and you’re finding the no-egg version too dense, go through all the tips on this page–and if you’re still not happy with the density of the loaf-breads, consider  using the dough for flatbreads that won’t require as much structure and loft.

If you’re making the gluten-free recipes from The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, there were typos that mainly affected the gluten-free recipes. Click here to view the corrections. The recipes will seem much too wet without these corrections.

Inadequate mixing: Consider using a stand mixer if you’re finding the loaves to be denser than you like. It’s certainly possible to get good results by mixing with a spoon or dough whisk, but you really have to work at it, to get a completely smooth mixture, and some of our readers are giving up too soon. Bottom line, the stand mixer will give more reliable results. One thing to be aware of–the very high capacity stand mixers (eg., 6-quart) don’t work well for this gluten-free dough–it seems to “climb” up the flat beater and avoid the mixing process. Stick with the 5-quart capacity, or the 5.5-quart.

Wrong hydration: In other words, too much or too little water relative to the flour mixture. If you’re swapping for a flour that we didn’t test with, go back to Bob’s Red Mills gluten-free flours, which are the only ones readily available in U.S. supermarkets, and test again. Other flours may absorb water differently, and you may need to adjust. If you can’t find Bob’s, you may need to adjust the water–take a look at our videos so you can see what the dough looks like fully mixed. If there’s no explanation for your overly wet dough, consider mixing it a little drier next time–increase the flour by 1/8-cup, or decrease the liquids a little.

Swapping in a flour or other ingredient we didn’t test with: As above, all bets are off if you aren’t using what we tested with. In particular, we did not have good results with rice flours from Asian markets.

Measurement  problems: You’ll get most accurate results if you weigh the ingredients rather than using cup-measures. We’ve had good experience with the Escali and the Eatsmart digital scales. Cup measures may be allowing too much (or too little) flour, which throws off the hydration. If you do use cup-measures, be sure to pack the flours into the cup (like you were measuring brown sugar). These flours are powdery, and we found this to be the only way to get reasonably consistent volume measurements with gluten-free flours (this is very different from what we recommended in our wheat-based books).

Oven temperature may be off: Always check with an oven thermometer.

Adequately preheat your baking stone: Some ovens require a longer preheat than the 20 or 30 minutes we specify in the book.

Resting time: Make sure you’re resting for the full interval that we recommend in the book.

Large loaf: In general, we tested these as small loaves (usually one pound), so if you made something larger, rest them for longer, and bake them for longer.

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